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The Australian bushfire crisis

As news of Australia’s bushfire crisis makes headlines around the world, many colleagues, customers and friends have contacted us to share their concern and offer support and well wishes.

The Sunshine Coast (where our head office is located) experienced several severe bushfires late last year—thankfully no one on our team was directly impacted, except by smoke.

Photo of a small tree with green leaves on a ridge. There is a swathe of burnt forest in the background, where the tree trunks are blackened and the leaves of the canopy are red and orange. A row of houses is visible just beyond the edge of the burnt area.
The landscape is slowly recovering at Peregian Springs on the Sunshine Coast after a severe bushfire in late 2019.

We are a long way north of the current bushfire crisis in NSW, Victoria and South Australia, but it’s a distressing and challenging time for many Australians, whether we’re in the path of the fires or not.

Typefi is supporting the bushfire relief effort with financial donations to several organisations and causes.

Feeding growing minds in Maa Oya

Chathini Uduwana
Regional Manager Sri Lanka, Typefi

At Typefi, we believe in the importance of doing our bit for others. Every year, our Colombo team works on a Corporate Responsibility Project to give back to the Sri Lankan community—last year we organised and donated school supplies to 55 school children at Weragala Primary School, and this year we decided to support families in another disadvantaged community.

We have the most beautiful and untouched beaches on the East Coast of Sri Lanka. My husband and I visit the East Coast every year as a ritual, taking the opportunity to breathe in the smell of salt, feel fresh sand under our feet, and experience the local food and culture.

It was during these yearly trips we began to notice small children selling things on the roadside, clearly suffering from hunger. There were many primary school age kids in school uniforms, selling fish or vegetables. Sri Lanka has almost a 92% literacy rate, one of the highest in Asia, and it’s even higher in younger demographics.

Two children stand in bare dirt outside a hut in the Sri Lankan village of Maa Oya. The hut has clay walls and a corrugated iron roof that is patched with pieces of fabric and shadecloth.
Children in Maa Oya.

But while education is free, it can be difficult for many to put food on the table to support their children’s physical growth and development.

Happy 20th birthday, InDesign!

10 Typefi team members lay out their InDesign memories and tips.

Morgaine Auton
Marketing Assistant, Typefi

1999 was a big year. President Clinton was acquitted, The Matrix premiered in cinemas across the globe, Napster pioneered peer-to-peer file sharing, and the Y2K bug was still capturing the public zeitgeist.

Perhaps most significantly for us here at Typefi, and for many people working in publishing around the world, the first version of Adobe InDesign was released in August of that year.

A delicious-looking cupcake with white icing and a black square decoration on top in the shape of the InDesign logo. The words '20 years' are written on the bottom of the logo. There is a pile of mixed nuts on the plate next to the cupcake.
Birthday cupcakes at CreativePro Week 2019.

Called InDesign 1.0, the 1999 version was created as a replacement for Adobe’s retiring desktop software, Adobe PageMaker, which was struggling to compete with QuarkXPress, the leading desktop publishing software at the time.

The release of the OS X compatible InDesign 2.0 in 2002 made it the first desktop publishing software in the space, helping cinch its position as an industry standard amongst Apple users in the creative industries.

The Publishing Machine: How automation makes space for creativity

Damian Gibbs
Solutions Consultant, Typefi

It is a curious thing, publishing books. I’ve never been sure if it is more art or science; either way, there is no doubt that both are involved, and one without the other amounts to naught.

Access to literature has come a long way since early handwritten manuscripts, thanks to moveable type and the printing press, largely attributed to Johannes Gutenberg. The “technology” Gutenberg leveraged was his own trade of blacksmithing. This is as far from being a scribe as you could imagine—metal versus paper, a loud, hot workshop versus the quiet library environment.

Stock photo of an antique printing press.
The printing press—an early industry disruptor!

It is unknown how or why Gutenberg formalised the concept of moveable type and the printing press, but it is an early example of “disruption” by someone “outside of the business”.

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