Author Archive

Happy 20th birthday, InDesign!

10 Typefi team members lay out their InDesign memories and tips.

Morgaine Auton
Marketing Assistant, Typefi

1999 was a big year. President Clinton was acquitted, The Matrix premiered in cinemas across the globe, Napster pioneered peer-to-peer file sharing, and the Y2K bug was still capturing the public zeitgeist.

Perhaps most significantly for us here at Typefi, and for many people working in publishing around the world, the first version of Adobe InDesign was released in August of that year.

A delicious-looking cupcake with white icing and a black square decoration on top in the shape of the InDesign logo. The words '20 years' are written on the bottom of the logo. There is a pile of mixed nuts on the plate next to the cupcake.
Birthday cupcakes at CreativePro Week 2019.

Called InDesign 1.0, the 1999 version was created as a replacement for Adobe’s retiring desktop software, Adobe PageMaker, which was struggling to compete with QuarkXPress, the leading desktop publishing software at the time.

The release of the OS X compatible InDesign 2.0 in 2002 made it the first desktop publishing software in the space, helping cinch its position as an industry standard amongst Apple users in the creative industries.

The Publishing Machine: How automation makes space for creativity

Damian Gibbs
Solutions Consultant, Typefi

It is a curious thing, publishing books. I’ve never been sure if it is more art or science; either way, there is no doubt that both are involved, and one without the other amounts to naught.

Access to literature has come a long way since early handwritten manuscripts, thanks to moveable type and the printing press, largely attributed to Johannes Gutenberg. The “technology” Gutenberg leveraged was his own trade of blacksmithing. This is as far from being a scribe as you could imagine—metal versus paper, a loud, hot workshop versus the quiet library environment.

Stock photo of an antique printing press.
The printing press—an early industry disruptor!

It is unknown how or why Gutenberg formalised the concept of moveable type and the printing press, but it is an early example of “disruption” by someone “outside of the business”.

Work smarter, not longer

Morgaine Auton
Marketing Assistant, Typefi

Microsoft Japan made news recently when the results of its four-day working week experiment were made public.

Attempting to combat a culture of overworking and burnout, the company implemented a four-day working week, and productivity boomed. Employees were also encouraged to have fewer meetings, set a half-hour time cap, and limit meetings to a maximum of five people.

Eight members of the Typefi team standing around one end of a board room table, watching something on a screen and laughing.
This Typefi meeting has more than five people. So inefficient!

Not only did employees have more efficient meetings and take less time off, but costs declined, and 92% of workers said they preferred the change. Productivity skyrocketed by a whopping 40%, while the offices used 23% less electricity and 59% fewer print pages.

Unprettify CXML code in Oxygen XML Editor

Peter Kahrel
Scripting Engineer, Typefi

XML and CXML code, when seen as one long string, is pretty unintelligible.

In Oxygen XML Editor you can make that code readable by prettifying it (Oxygen calls it ‘Format and indent’). That’s very useful, but the problem is that because of whitespace issues you can’t edit the code, save it, and use it in a Typefi job.

To use a formatted and edited CXML file in a Typefi job, you’d have to unprettify it to remove all the indents and line breaks. But, strangely, Oxygen doesn’t have such a function. However, you can unprettify prettified code with a simple find-and-replace operation.

× Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty.