News + Events

Find out what's happening.

Happy 20th birthday, InDesign!

10 Typefi team members lay out their InDesign memories and tips.

Morgaine Auton
Marketing Assistant, Typefi

1999 was a big year. President Clinton was acquitted, The Matrix premiered in cinemas across the globe, Napster pioneered peer-to-peer file sharing, and the Y2K bug was still capturing the public zeitgeist.

Perhaps most significantly for us here at Typefi, and for many people working in publishing around the world, the first version of Adobe InDesign was released in August of that year.

A delicious-looking cupcake with white icing and a black square decoration on top in the shape of the InDesign logo. The words '20 years' are written on the bottom of the logo. There is a pile of mixed nuts on the plate next to the cupcake.
Birthday cupcakes at CreativePro Week 2019.

Called InDesign 1.0, the 1999 version was created as a replacement for Adobe’s retiring desktop software, Adobe PageMaker, which was struggling to compete with QuarkXPress, the leading desktop publishing software at the time.

The release of the OS X compatible InDesign 2.0 in 2002 made it the first desktop publishing software in the space, helping cinch its position as an industry standard amongst Apple users in the creative industries.

Unprettify CXML code in Oxygen XML Editor

Peter Kahrel
Scripting Engineer, Typefi

XML and CXML code, when seen as one long string, is pretty unintelligible.

In Oxygen XML Editor you can make that code readable by prettifying it (Oxygen calls it ‘Format and indent’). That’s very useful, but the problem is that because of whitespace issues you can’t edit the code, save it, and use it in a Typefi job.

To use a formatted and edited CXML file in a Typefi job, you’d have to unprettify it to remove all the indents and line breaks. But, strangely, Oxygen doesn’t have such a function. However, you can unprettify prettified code with a simple find-and-replace operation.

Formatting the unformattable in InDesign

Peter Kahrel
Scripting Engineer, Typefi

In a Typefi workflow, if you want some text to automatically appear in a certain format in InDesign, you can apply that formatting as a local override or with a character style in your Word document, or encode it in an XML file.

This method of text formatting can’t be used in Typefi fields, because the composition engine doesn’t see that content. Typefi field content can contain only plain text: no formatting is possible.

However, this limitation can be overcome by including some rudimentary, HTML-like text tags in the field content and one or more GREP styles in the InDesign paragraph styles applied to the fields.

Title page of Peter Kahrel's 'Going deep with footnotes' article in the March 2017 issue of InDesign Magazine. The image shows a person in scuba diving gear ignoring the brightly-coloured fish and coral behind them to look at the ocean floor where a dictionary definition of footnotes is printed on the sand.

Going deep with footnotes

Whether you’re explaining, referencing, or elaborating, footnotes and endnotes are an invaluable design tool. However, as with every little (and big) part of a page layout, someone has to format them—and that can mean a lot of pain, particularly since InDesign’s built-in footnotes feature leaves much to be desired.

In the March 2017 InDesign Magazine article Going deep with footnotes, world-renowned scripting engineer Peter Kahrel shows you what can be achieved—from basic footnotes, endnotes, and margin notes, through to table notes and complex multiple footnote threads—with workarounds and scripts.

× Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty.